Breaking Down 5 Misconceptions to Accelerate Green Development

BARCELONA, Spain, Feb. 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Huawei hosted its Day0 Forum “Lighting up the Future” as part of their lead up to MWC22 Barcelona. Huawei Carrier’s Chief Marketing Officer Dr. Philip Song delivered a keynote speech titled “Five Misconceptions of Green Development” at the forum. He said, “Green development is a buzzword. Just like […]

BARCELONA, Spain, Feb. 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Huawei hosted its Day0 Forum “Lighting up the Future” as part of their lead up to MWC22 Barcelona. Huawei Carrier’s Chief Marketing Officer Dr. Philip Song delivered a keynote speech titled “Five Misconceptions of Green Development” at the forum. He said, “Green development is a buzzword. Just like from Newton’s classical mechanics to Einstein’s theory of relativity, its development is going to be marked by a spiraling path between misconceptions and truths. We need to move past these five misconceptions as soon as possible to accelerate the green development of the ICT industry.”

Misconception 1: ICT industry contributes to increased carbon emission. According to the GeSI’s SMARTer2030 report, the ICT industry is only expected to account for 1.97% of global carbon emissions by 2030. More importantly though, other industries are expected to reduce their own carbon emissions 20% by applying ICT technologies, a total amount 10 times the carbon emissions of the ICT industry itself. These secondary savings are called carbon handprint. The size of this carbon handprint has made ICT infrastructure increasingly important in many national strategies. Huawei itself predicts that 1 YB of global data will be stored on the cloud by 2030. This means that 150 million tons of carbon emissions can be saved each year if current infrastructure is equipped with greener, all-optical transmission technologies. These savings would be equivalent to planting 200 million trees – an amount that would cover the entirety of Europe in forest.

Misconception 2: There is over-focusing on supply chain emissions, which are regarded as the largest cause of carbon emissions for network equipment. As Dr. Song described in his presentation, if you look at the entire life cycle of network equipment, only 2% of its carbon emissions are generated during manufacturing, while 80-95% are generated during usage. Dr. Song therefore proposed that the key to reducing ICT industry carbon emissions will be adopting innovative technologies to improve energy efficiency.

Misconception 3: Green development is only about green energy. While the development of solar and wind power are important to green development in the ICT industry, huge gains can be achieved by systematically improving the energy efficiency of telecom networks. To this end, Huawei released a three-layer green solution at this summit to systematically improve network energy efficiency through “Green Site, Green Network, and Green Operation”, helping carriers achieve “More Bits, Less Watts”.

Misconception 4: Network energy efficiency is equal to the sum of energy efficiencies of its telecom equipment. The energy efficiency evaluation of a single equipment box is not enough to carry out comprehensive, scenario-based planning and construction decisions. Huawei recommended establishing a unified, standardized indicator system (NCI) to accurately evaluate and formulate energy-saving policies for entire networks by measuring the energy efficiency indicators of main communications equipment, site auxiliary equipment, transport networks, and data centers.

Misconception 5: Energy saving should not impact any network performance indicator. The truth is, there is trade-off between energy saving features and some network indicators. However, energy saving features can be adopted at the expense of peak rates and some other indicators, but without impacting actual user experience. In Germany, an intelligent shutdown solution has been deployed in shopping malls at midnight. Although it slightly reduces peak rates, it reduces site energy consumption by 10% without affecting user experience.

During his closing remarks, Dr. Song delivered five suggestions for green development in the ICT industry: “First, we should vigorously develop the ICT industry to enable green development in other industries. Second, we must pay more attention to carbon emissions of ICT infrastructure during usage rather than just during manufacturing. Third, the systematic solution of “Green Site, Green Network, and Green Operation” will help carriers continuously improve network capacity and reduce power consumption per bit, achieving “More Bits, Less Watts”. Fourth, we must define a unified energy efficiency indicator system to identify the main problems of energy consumption. Fifth, watts are decided by user experience.”

MWC22 Barcelona will run from February 28 to March 3 in Barcelona, Spain. Huawei will showcase its products and solutions at stand 1H50 in Fira Gran Via Hall 1. Together with global operators, industry professionals, and opinion leaders, we will dive into topics such as industry trends, GUIDE to the Future, and green development to envision the future of digital networks. For more information, please visit: https://carrier.huawei.com/en/events/mwc2022.

Photo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1754986/PhillipSongPhoto.jpg

Huawei’s Ryan Ding: GUIDE to a Better Digital Economy

BARCELONA, Spain, Feb. 27, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — At the Huawei Day0 Forum held the day before MWC22 Barcelona, Ryan Ding, Huawei’s Executive Director and President of the Carrier BG, gave a keynote speech entitled “Lighting up the Future”. Ding said that operators can work on three factors: connection density, computing diversity, and carbon reduction intensity, and […]

BARCELONA, Spain, Feb. 27, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — At the Huawei Day0 Forum held the day before MWC22 Barcelona, Ryan Ding, Huawei’s Executive Director and President of the Carrier BG, gave a keynote speech entitled “Lighting up the Future”. Ding said that operators can work on three factors: connection density, computing diversity, and carbon reduction intensity, and called on operators to join Huawei in its GUIDE business blueprint to create a better digital economy together.

The global digital economy is developing rapidly, and over 50% of global GDP will be digitalized in 2022. Many countries and regions, like China, South Korea, and the EU, have already announced huge investment plans for the digital economy. As ICT infrastructure providers, operators will play an increasingly important role in leading the development of the future digital economy.

Three levers to shape the future of the digital economy
During his keynote, Ding explained that the vitality of digital economy can be evaluated by three factors: connection density, computing diversity, and carbon reduction intensity, and that these factors give operators the levers they need to shape the future of the digital economy.

By increasing connection density, operators can grow their 5G user base and expand their business scope. By diversifying their computing resources, operators can create synergies between connectivity and IT to boost enterprise digitalization for new growth. In carbon reduction, new green ICT solutions, like those Huawei provides, will increase network capacity and cut the energy consumption per bit for greener development.

5G has come a long way
Commercial 5G deployment started two years ago, and since then, the numbers of 5G networks, users, and devices have grown rapidly. By the end of 2021, more than 200 operators have deployed commercial 5G networks, servicing more than 700 million 5G users. There are currently over 1,200 commercial 5G devices in use. This growing user base is bringing commercial returns to operators while driving continuous network rollouts.

During the event, Ding shared 5G success stories from various operators and showed how new 5G applications like AR, VR, and new video are offering users new experiences. Flexible 5G pricing models are also benefiting both users and operators and driving rapid growth in the 5G user base.

In China, 5GtoB private networks have been deployed at scale in multiple industries. By the end of 2021, Huawei has signed more than 3,000 commercial 5GtoB contracts with Chinese operators and partners, gaining a wealth of experience in industry applications. One highlighted example was from China’s Inner Mongolia, where a coal mine is using 5G to remotely control shearers. Since 5G was deployed, coal miners have been working in a safer and more comfortable environment.

Connectivity + IT for new growth
According to Ding, as more industries are going digital, IT infrastructure will need to be rebuilt to drive more efficient operations. By creating synergies between IT and CT, cloud and edge, and cloud and networks, Huawei hopes to help operators go digital and intelligent and achieve new revenue growth. In Asia Pacific, for example, Huawei’s OneStorage solution has helped one operator cut TCO by 30%.

Green ICT: More Bits, Less Watts
Green ICT is key to sustainable growth in the digital economy. The ICT industry is providing new technologies to help other industries reduce their carbon footprints. In fact, these savings are predicted to amount to ten times larger than the ICT industry’s own footprint. At the forum, Ding also shared Huawei’s green strategy: More Bits, Less Watts. With its full range of green solutions, including green site, green network, and green operation, Huawei aims to help operators increase network capacity and cut the energy consumption per bit. Huawei also proposed the Network Carbon Intensity index to quantify the carbon emissions of the ICT industry and help operators make their green strategy a reality.

At the end of his speech, Ding proposed Huawei’s GUIDE business blueprint, which aims to help operators develop the five key capabilities required for business success: expanding services, innovating efficiently, leveraging resources, competing on value, and contributing to society.

MWC22 Barcelona will run from February 28 to March 3 in Barcelona, Spain. Huawei will showcase its products and solutions at stand 1H50 in Fira Gran Via Hall 1. Together with global operators, industry professionals, and opinion leaders, we will dive into topics such as industry trends, GUIDE to the Future, and green development to envision the future of digital networks. For more information, please visit: https://carrier.huawei.com/en/events/mwc2022.

Photo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1754974/Huawei.jpg

 

 

20 Dead in Rebel Attack in Eastern Congo

About 20 people in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo were killed in a fresh attack by the suspected Allied Democratic Forces (ADF) rebel group, monitors said Monday.”At least 20 civilians were killed in #Kikura village (#Beni territory, North #Kivu)…

About 20 people in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo were killed in a fresh attack by the suspected Allied Democratic Forces (ADF) rebel group, monitors said Monday.

“At least 20 civilians were killed in #Kikura village (#Beni territory, North #Kivu) on Sunday night. The #ADF are suspected,” the U.S.-based Kivu Security Tracker (KST) said on Twitter.

Ricardo Rupande, head of a local association of grassroots groups, gave the same toll and urged the armed forces to take action against the rebels.

David Moaze, a lawyer and coordinator for a DRC rights group called ADDHO, said two women and a girl around age 9 were among the dead.

The ADF — which Islamic State describes as its local affiliate — has been blamed for thousands of deaths in eastern DRC, as well as a spate of recent bomb attacks in the Ugandan capital, Kampala.

Last May, the DRC government imposed a “state of siege” in North Kivu and neighboring Ituri in a bid to crush armed groups that plague the two provinces.

Under it, senior civilian positions in the provinces have been taken over by army or police officers.

Despite the crackdown, and cross-border support from Ugandan forces that began in late November, the ADF’s attacks have continued.

Kikura, where the latest bloodshed took place, lies around 15 kilometers from a Ugandan army base in eastern DRC at Mukakati.

The DRC army and U.N. peacekeeping mission MONUSCO, in the DRC, are also present in the area.

Rupande said the armed forces “have given the enemy time to organize.”

The ADF was historically a Ugandan rebel coalition whose biggest group comprised of Muslims opposed to Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni.

But it established itself in eastern DRC in 1995, becoming the deadliest of scores of outlawed forces in the troubled region.

Islamic State presents the ADF as its regional branch — the Islamic State Central Africa Province, or ISCAP.

In March 2020, the United States placed the ADF on its list of “terrorist groups” affiliated with IS jihadists.

Source: Voice of America

Can African Oil Producers Take Advantage of Increasing Oil Prices?

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and the sanctions that followed, has pushed the price of oil to over $100 per barrel, the highest level in eight years. But, it’s also opened an opportunity for African oil producers like Nigeria, Angola, Libya, and Algeri…

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and the sanctions that followed, has pushed the price of oil to over $100 per barrel, the highest level in eight years. But, it’s also opened an opportunity for African oil producers like Nigeria, Angola, Libya, and Algeria to cash in with more crude oil exports.

Crude oil prices hit $105 per barrel last week, their highest mark since 2014, and up by 47% since December, amid fears that supplies from Russia may be impacted by its war with Ukraine.

Russia accounts for about 10 percent of the world’s crude oil output, making it the third-biggest producer globally, behind the United States and Saudi Arabia.

But experts say the Ukraine invasion and the sanctions slapped on Russia by Europe and the United States could significantly reduce demand for Russian products and increase the demand for Africa’s.

Isaac Botti is a public finance expert in Abuja.

“For Africa it’s a gain, it’s an opportunity,” Botti said. “It presents that window of opportunity for African countries to see how they can increase their production capacity and meet the need of global demands of crude oil.”

Nigeria is Africa’s largest producer of oil at about 1.9 million barrels per day, followed by Libya, Angola and Algeria.

That positions those countries to reap windfall profits from rising oil prices. But economic analyst Paul Enyim notes that Nigeria will have to pay on the other end for finished products like gasoline.

“At the end of the day, it’s going to hit on our economy,” Enyim said. “We may think that we’ll gain but remember we don’t refine our crude oil.”

All of Nigeria’s refineries were shut down in 2020 because of money and maintenance issues and have yet to reopen. The country now depends entirely on imports to meet its fuel needs.

For weeks, Nigeria has been battling to increase its national fuel supply after authorities recalled millions of liters of tainted imported petrol from circulation, causing a major shortage in West Africa’s most populous nation.

In contrast, Algeria, which does have refineries, said this week that it would supply Europe with petroleum products if necessary.

Botti said it’s a good example for other African nations.

“We need to develop our capacity to produce locally, we need to look at various trade agreements that are existing,” Botti said.

As Russia’s war on Ukraine persists, experts say the shifting focus on Africa could be both a blessing and a burden.

Source: Voice of America

Ukraine Crisis: Will African Oil Producers Take Advantage of Increasing Oil Prices?

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and the sanctions that followed, has pushed the price of oil to over $100 per barrel, the highest level in eight years. But, it’s also opened an opportunity for African oil producers like Nigeria, Angola, Libya, and Algeri…

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and the sanctions that followed, has pushed the price of oil to over $100 per barrel, the highest level in eight years. But, it’s also opened an opportunity for African oil producers like Nigeria, Angola, Libya, and Algeria to cash in with more crude oil exports. But a lack of refineries in Africa means crude oil exporters will also have to pay more for imported fuels.

The Brent crude oil prices hit $105 per barrel last week, it’s highest mark since 2014 and up by 47% since December, amid fears that supplies from Russia may be impacted by crisis.

Russia accounts for a significant amount of the world’s total crude oil output between 25-30% making it the second highest producer globally.

But experts say the crisis and sanctions slammed on Russia by Europe and America could significantly impact demand for Russian products and tip the odds in Africa’s favor.

“For Africa it’s a gain, it’s an opportunity, it presents that window of opportunity for African countries to see how they can increase their production capacity and meet the need of global demands of crude oil,” says Isaac Botti, a public finance expert.

However, Africa’s production combined accounts for less than a tenth of total global output. Nigeria is Africa’s largest producer of oil followed by Libya. Other notable producers are Algeria and Angola.

Experts predict oil prices will rise further but worry Nigeria could be facing a backlash.

“At the end of the day it’s going to hit on our economy. We may think that we’ll gain but remember we don’t refine out crude oil,” said economic analyst Paul Enyim.

Nigerian refineries have been shut down for about one year. The country depends on imports to meet it’s energy needs. Experts say prices paid for imported will also increase.

Authorities are also grappling with huge subsidies to keep pump price of oil products within affordable limits.

Last week Nigeria’s minister of state for Petroleum said authorities were not comfortable with the surge in prices of crude oil.

But this week, Algerian state-owned oil and gas giant said it would supply Europe if Russian exports dwindled as a result of the crisis.

Botti says it’s a good example for other African nations.

“We need to develop our capacity to produce locally, we need to look at various trade agreements that are existing,” he said.

For years African oil producers including Nigeria have been struggling to meet required daily output levels.

Experts however worry African producers may struggle to fit into the big market with increasing global demands for crude oil.

For weeks, Nigeria has been battling to normalize fuel supply in the country after authorities recalled millions of liters of adulterated petrol from circulation causing a major shortage in West Africa’s most populous nation.

As the crises between Russia and Ukraine lingers, experts say the shifting focus on Africa could be both a blessing and a burden.

Source: Voice of America